BAILEY LANGBO
STAFF WRITER

On Aug. 20, 11-yearold Addison Redman was shot to death in her home in Arcada Township, just south of Alma. Her body was found on Tuesday morning by a relative, who then called 911.

Redman was about to begin the sixth grade at Alma Public Schools. She was involved in the county fair as an award-winning 4-H member, and she took second place at the Large Animal Junior Showmanship Sweepstakes just a few weeks before her death.

Redman was known for thinking about and helping her competitors, despite knowing that helping them would make the competition tougher for her. Redman was also a member of the Alma Strikers, a local soccer team.

Police say that the pathologist ruled the case as a homicide, although investigators still believe that the shooting could have been an accident. Police have declared that they have a person of interest in the case, but that no conclusions have yet been reached.

A candlelight vigil was held on Aug. 26 at the fairgrounds where Redman loved to compete for so many years. Visitation took place on Aug. 29 at the Dewey Funeral Home in Alma. Along with these services, friends and family are paying tribute to Addison on social media, and counseling services are available at Alma Middle School.

Heather Abdulla works at and manages Biggby Coffee, located on Wright Avenue. For the past six years, ever since the Alma location opened, Matt and Mary Redman have been regular customers.

Mary Redman owns a bakery, where she makes cakes for Biggby staff going-away parties, and several employees are friends with the Redman family on Facebook.

When the staff heard what had happened to the Redman family, they launched into action.

“I had baristas reaching out to me, and people who hadn’t worked here in six years were asking if we were doing anything,” said Abdulla. “Everybody needs help once in a while. We decided to help the only way we knew how.”

On Aug. 26, the Alma location of Biggby Coffee launched a fundraiser called Coffee for a Cause, with donation jars out on the counters instead of the usual tip jars. “We put a picture of Addison and Mary on one, and Addison and Matt on the other,” said Abdulla. I

n addition to the proceeds made from the donation jars, the store’s owner decided to donate fifty percent of their net sales from that day to the family.

“We know a lot of people throughout the community,” said Abdulla. “We’re big on helping people here.”

As the Gratiot County continues to heal from Addison Redman’s death, the family asks that instead of flowers, donations can be made to the Addison Redman Memorial Fund at any Commercial Bank. Checks can also be mailed to Commercial Bank, 1690 Wright Avenue, Alma, MI 48801.