WADE FULLERTON
STAFF WRITER

President Donald J Trump set into motion a government shutdown – the second longest in United States history – after negations on the boarder wall. The duration of the shutdown remains uncertain, but its affect resonates throughout the lives of the students on campus.

The government shutdown affects the pay of federal employees, the maintenance of National Parks, government funding and the disposal of street garbage in Washington DC.

A main concern of the recent government shutdown has revolved around the anticipation of tax returns. For most students on campus, tax returns are beneficial to those who work a part-time job that pays less than ten thousand dollars per year.

The chief concern of some students going into the shutdown was whether or not they’ll receive their tax returns. With the recent government shutdown looming close to the month of April, tensions run high on whether or not people will receive their tax returns.

“They need to figure out how to get the government back on their feet sooner rather than later. An alternate solution needs to be established in order to pay government employees,” said Molly Strunk (’20).

The IRS made a statement promising to keep tax returns open following the concerns of those who voiced their opinions after the government shutdown. Whether or not the tax returns will be filed smoothly and on time will be answered within the next coming weeks of the shutdown.

“I need tax return money to pay off my college payments. Imagining that the government would hold back on handing back tax returns would be wrong,” said Strunk. The government shutdown affects students through other means of financial tension. For some students on campus, their parents have government positions. The duration of the government shutdown wears at the finances of those who rely on government paychecks.

“I realize that things like this happen, but it’s gotten out of hand. Both of my parents work for the Forest Service. Another month that the government is shutdown means another month without a paycheck,” said Jack Montgomery (’20).

The amount of government employees that are affected by the government shutdown continues to grow. They continue to work without pay until the government is reopened. The length at which the shutdown will last could turn into weeks or months according to the speculations of some students.

“Hopefully the shutdown will be lifted within the next few weeks or so,” said Joey Tighe (’21).

Tighe later mentioned that he knew his friend’s family worked for the Coast Guard and that the government shutdown is affecting their pay as well. This government shutdown has become the longest in the history of the United States. The IRS promising tax returns is clear at the present moment, but further details will soon be known.